Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Visit to Fougères Castle

On our first day in Rennes, Monique and Pierre drove us to a lovely Medieval village of Fougères. Fougères is located near the coast in the northwest corner of France. The village is most famous for the 11th century castle that dominates the landscape.

During the medieval period, Fougères was an important commercial centre that was known for the quality of its shoe making and weaving. In the 19th century, Victor Hugo traveled to the city to find inspiration for his novels.



This picture, taken from the interior of the castle, shows some of the details of the chateau. I was quite surprised by the size of the stones that were used to construct the castle. Most of the other castles I've seen contain are constructed out of much pieces of stone. Our friend Pierre believed that the people who originally constructed the castle used the local stones to construct the castle because there weren't any rock quarries near by, but I haven't found any research done on this. If any one knows, please share!

Oh, and I also loved all the wildflowers growing in the crooks and crannies of the castle walls!



One of the most charming things about Fougères is that the oldest part of the town has been restored to its Medieval splendor. Many of the buildings now house touristy businesses like traditional creperies, where you sit on the patio and enjoy some cider while taking in a view of the castle!

4 comments:

Tracy said...

Simply magnificent...*SIGH* Happy Days ((HUGS))

skatej said...

Ah, to see France. It looks BEAUTIFUL!

Thorsprincess said...

The website for Monique & Pierre's work in Niger (and her charming book) is http://enfantduniger.blogspot.com/

She wrote to thank you for your compliments in your blog. They are truly remarkable people and very dear friends. Momma

M.KATE said...

My dear Margaret :)
Love this post, love castles all the time!! Somehow, when i grow older I have a fascination for castles (not that we have any here) and ruins. It's nice to see and feel a piece of history, reminding us of our roots (even if we were not born there)...must be my age :)